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Guest on Pundit Review
Aug 8th, 2011 by Sam

What fun this was….

Joined Kevin Whaylen on his show Pundit Review on Boston’s AM 68o WRKO for an hour of “downgrades, debt, deficits, new tone and even fusion energy.”  Was a ton of fun and we’ll get together for more….

Check out the audio and Kevin’s thoughts about it all here.

Feb 20: Does walking away from a mortgage = ‘restructuring debt’?
Feb 19th, 2010 by Sam

On my mind….

  • Is it wrong for a corporation to ‘restructure’ (default) their debt?  They do it all the time.  If not, why can’t people walk away from their mortgages?
  • How Christian Were the Founders? – Texas, textbooks, religion, power, separation of church and state
  • Abstinence education – recent research sez that it works – the more abstinence is emphasized, the less likely kids are to report they had sex within two years of the education.  You suppose some kids aren’t reporting accurately?  You think some kids accurately report more than others?
  • Right-wing Tea Partiers – fact-based?  not so much.  getting bigger?  yep.  problem or distraction?  you tell me…

Plus…

Jeff Dorchen and his segment, Not to be rude, but…

Mp3

Payback Time – Party Gridlock in Washington Feeds Fear of a Debt Crisis – Series – NYTimes.com
Feb 18th, 2010 by Sam

Yet politicians’ failure to reduce deficits has long reflected voters’ opposition to the necessary steps. The poll also found that by a two-to-one ratio Americans oppose cutting health care and education; 51 percent oppose lower military spending.

via Payback Time – Party Gridlock in Washington Feeds Fear of a Debt Crisis – Series – NYTimes.com.

No Help in Sight, More Homeowners Walk Away
Feb 3rd, 2010 by Sam

If corporations have the same rights that people do, do people have the same rights that corporations do? Anybody know?  Can people walk away from their debts the way corporations do?

“I took a loan on an asset that I didn’t see was overvalued,” he said. “As much as I would like my bank to pay for that mistake, why should it?”

That is an attitude Wall Street would like to encourage. David Rosenberg, the chief economist of the investment firm Gluskin Sheff, wrote recently that borrowers were not victims. They “signed contracts, and as adults should also be held accountable,” he wrote.

Of course, this is not necessarily how Wall Street itself behaves, as demonstrated by the case of Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village. An investment group led by the real estate giant Tishman Speyer recently defaulted on $4.4 billion in debt that it had used to buy the two apartment developments in Manhattan, handing the properties back to the lenders.

Moreover, during the boom, it was the banks that helped drive prices to unrealistic levels by lowering credit standards and unleashing a wave of speculative housing demand.

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